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People attend court for many reasons.  They may be involved in the case such as the parties, lawyers, accused, witnesses, jurors or police officers. Members of the public may attend as the courts are open to the public except in certain circumstances. Certain standards of behaviour and dress must be observed in a court.

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HMA v James Cook, Peter Brown and Jamie Cook

At the High Court in Glasgow today, 30 July 2018, Lord Matthews sentenced James Cook, Peter Brown and Jamie Cook to life imprisonment after the three accused were found guilty of the murder of Jason McCue. James Cook was given a punishment part of 16 years and four months, Peter Brown was given a punishment part of 18 years, and Jamie Cook was given a punishment part of 17 years and three months.

On sentencing, Lord Matthews made the following statement in court:

“The jury found you all guilty of the murder of Jason McCue as well as of another offence or other offences to varying degrees.

“The jury obviously accepted that you Peter Brown and Jamie Cook visited Colin Ramage and Colin James Inglis in order to enforce payment of debts. The amounts of money involved were, in the scheme of things, miniscule but Mr Ramage was stabbed to his severe injury and danger of his life, while Mr Inglis was injured to a much lesser degree and with no lasting physical consequences. Matters did not end there, however.

“Mr Inglis travelled to the deceased’s home and met not only him but James Adams and Thomas Sinclair. In a series of telephone calls between James Adams and you Jamie Cook it appears that a meeting was arranged in John Hastie Park for what Mr Adams said was to be a square go but no-one who heard the evidence could possibly have thought that it was not intended that weapons be used.

“The confrontation took place in a public park at the height of summer and in full view of families enjoying a day out and in the course of it you Jamie Cook were stabbed but Mr Sinclair and Mr Adams were injured and Jason McCue was stabbed fatally.

“The evidence was at times confusing but the verdict of the jury was clear and I must proceed to sentence you on the basis of it.

“The only penalty I can impose on the charge of murder is one of life imprisonment but in each case I have to decide on a period, known as the punishment part, which must pass before you can be considered for release on parole licence.

“Whether or not you are released at any time will be for others to decide but since this is a life sentence, not merely a sentence for the determinate number of years I am about to fix, you will be subject to recall to prison at any time for the rest of your lives if you break the conditions of your licence.

“I take account of the circumstances of the offences, and what the jury must have taken from the evidence, the other offences of which you have been convicted on this indictment, your personal circumstances, everything said on behalf of each of you and the contents of the criminal justice social work reports, the authors of each of which fail to recognise, it seems, that the only penalty for murder is life imprisonment.

“I have also had regard to your previous convictions and to the victim statements submitted by Mr Ramage and by the parents of the deceased Jason McCue. It is obvious that his loss has affected them deeply and no sentence I can pass will adequately compensate them.

“James Cook, you were convicted of charge 4, the assault to injury on Thomas Sinclair and charge 6, the murder of Jason McCue. Both offences were committed while you were on bail

“You have a number of previous convictions.  There are three for assault to severe injury, three for assault to injury and one for assault as well as breaches of the peace and road traffic offences. However, you have never before served a custodial sentence.

“Peter Brown, you were convicted of charge 2, an assault to severe injury and danger of life on Colin Ramage, involving a knife, Charge 3, an assault to injury on Colin James Inglis, charge 4, an assault to injury on Thomas Sinclair and charge 6, the murder of Jason McCue.

“You have a number of previous convictions including an assault to severe injury and permanent disfigurement which resulted in imprisonment for six months, an assault to severe injury which resulted in imprisonment by the High Court for four years, an assault and robbery which attracted imprisonment for 39 months, an assault resulting in 60 days imprisonment and another resulting in imprisonment for 30 days. As well as that you have been convicted of possession of a knife and sundry other matters such as theft, road traffic and drugs offences.

“Jamie Cook, you were convicted of charge 2, the assault to severe injury and danger of life on Colin Ramage, involving a knife, Charge 3, the  assault to injury on Colin James Inglis, charge 4, the assault to injury on Thomas Sinclair, charge 5, an assault to injury on James Adams and charge 6, the murder of Jason McCue. All of these offences were committed while you were on bail

“You have a limited number of previous convictions.  They are for possession of a knife, breaches of bail and possession of cannabis with intent to supply. They are of little significance.

“James Cook, I sentence you as follows: on charge 4, imprisonment for six months with three months being in respect of the bail aggravation; on charge 6, imprisonment for life with a punishment part of 16 years and four months, three months being for the bail aggravation. The sentences will run concurrently with each other and from 13 July 2017.

“Peter Brown, I sentence you as follows: on charge 2, imprisonment for four years; on charge 3, imprisonment for nine months; on charge 4, imprisonment for nine months; on charge 6, imprisonment for life with a punishment part of 18 years. The sentences will run concurrently with each other and from 18 July 2017.

“Jamie Cook, I sentence you as follows: on charge 2, imprisonment for two years and three months with three months of that attributable to the bail aggravation; on charge 3, imprisonment for four months with two months of that attributable to the bail aggravation; on charge 4, imprisonment for four months with two months of that attributable to the bail aggravation; on charge 5, imprisonment for six months with three months of that attributable to the bail aggravation; on charge 6, imprisonment for life with a punishment part of 17 years and three months, three months of which is attributable to the bail aggravation. The sentences will run concurrently with each other and from 14 July 2017.”

Sentencing Statements

HMA v Dylan Walker

Tuesday, 18 September, 2018

HMA v Jagtar Singh

Thursday, 13 September, 2018

HMA v William Wright

Tuesday, 11 September, 2018

HMA v Neil Addison

Monday, 10 September, 2018

HMA v Paul McCandish

Monday, 10 September, 2018